Posted 2nd March 2016 | By Jack Rogers, Web Designer

So, this is my first blog post for ExtraMile Communications since starting on the 1st February 2016 as a Web Designer. Recently I read a blog post that explained "10 reasons not to date a designer". Now I can't lie and say this didn't intrigue me a little bit to see what they had to say about us designers.

I'll credit CreativeBloq for this blog post however I wont be saying whether it's a good or bad blog post just yet, I'm sitting on the fence.

So, this is my first blog post for ExtraMile Communications since starting on the 1st February 2016 as a Web Designer. Recently I read a blog post that explained "10 reasons not to date a designer". Now I can't lie and say this didn't intrigue me a little bit to see what they had to say about us designers. I'll credit CreativeBloq for this blog post however I wont be saying whether it's a good or bad blog post just yet, I'm sitting on the fence.

I would agree that some designers are a strange breed of people, similar to Goalkeepers in Football – but I won't bore you about Football, yet! In the blog post they list 10 reasons why you shouldn't date a designer, which I thought is a little harsh. These reasons were;

  1. You analyse everything
  2. You know who did everything
  3. Nothing can be normal
  4. You're never actually around
  5. You constantly talk about other designers
  6. You can't stop tinkering
  7. You can't stop buying "cool stuff"
  8. You're impossible to buy gifts for
  9. Everything has to look great. Always
  10. Your clothes

I read through this blog tentatively as I wasn't sure how accurate it could be, but it's safe to say I was pretty disappointed when I could relate to a few of these points. 

You analyse everything

This seems a good place to start, at the beginning. Analysing everything sounds pretty generic to a lot of people, we all analyse things don't we? Why does this associate with designers in particular? Then I realised a time around Christmas last year when I went to an eatery that just opened close to where I live. This place was called Gourmet Burger Kitchen or "GBK" if you're cool and a regular to the place. I got handed the menu and the first thing I did was sigh at the layout of the menu. Where do they want me to start - there was no easy layout, no organisation and there were wacky shapes all over the place that just confused me. Then I noticed a nice cursive font in the corner of my eye, I instantly recognised this font and thought this is a cool party trick to share. So I instantly said out loud "I bet you that this font is called "Pacifico" and it's a Google font (by the way there may be 10 reasons not to date a designer but it doesn't mean I don't have friends, I do, honestly). By this time my mate had already picked the food he wanted to get ordered, me on the other hand got my phone out to prove that I was right. I went straight onto Google Fonts and low and behold there it was, the font that was on the menu (cue cheesy smug smile). So we can check that one off as true, next... 

You can't stop tinkering

Again, can we really pin point this to designers in particular? Let's see, anecdote incoming... CreativeBloq mentioned that designers' minds start to wander, start thinking, which is a dangerous thing. You may have heard of a program on E4 called tattoo fixers - if you haven't then it's generally full of members of the public who thought it was a good idea to get a controversial tattoo while a little jolly on holiday in Magaluf, and now they want to get these tattoos covered up by the professionals. My mind then started to wonder, I'd like a tattoo, but what would I have? I don't follow any quotes in life that would look good in Latin, or have any message that is close to my heart. So that's when I thought it would be a good idea to design my own tattoo, then this would be bespoke to me and it would be different to everything else. So I went from watching the first 10 minutes of a 60 minute program to designing my tattoo for 2 hours. So unfortunately that's another reason ticked off the list. Anymore? 

Your clothes

Now, I like to make an effort with my appearance, it makes me feel more confident being in clothes that I like. CreativeBloq started this reason positively by saying "there's nothing wrong with wanting to look good". I agree. Then they mentioned the word hipster in the same sentence and my head hung in shame. Working at ExtraMile means that we use MacBooks Pros. These beautiful machines have a reputation of being used by a woman or man in Starbucks, with thick framed glasses with an order of a Grande, sugar-free, non-fat, vanilla soy, double shot, decaf, no foam, extra hot, peppermint white chocolate mocha, light whip, extra syrup. Not my personal preference but the point still stands. Then my mates saw my new glasses and automatically associated me with these "Hipsters". That's 3 points out of 10 that already apply to me so the future is looking bright.

I'd like to spare my feelings by not admitting to anymore of these reasons. How about a shameless plug? Surely these points showcase the passion that designers have for what they do considering they never switch off on how to take that project to the next level. No matter whether it's a website project or a personal project. We all have creative minds that are full of great ideas that need to be explored whether they work or not. Maybe that can be my tattoo?

Until next time, thanks for reading, Jack.

Written by Jack Rogers, Web Designer at ExtraMile Communications.

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